3 Tips on How to Evaluate Induction Cookware Before Purchasing

Cookware If you are thinking of updating your kitchen to something more modern and have been considering purchasing induction cookware, there are a few things to consider. Here is a helpful checklist to help you to evaluate induction cookware before...

Cookware
Cookware

If you are thinking of updating your kitchen to something more modern and have been considering purchasing induction cookware, there are a few things to consider. Here is a helpful checklist to help you to evaluate induction cookware before purchasing it.

First, what is induction cooking?

Induction heating works by heating a electrically conductive object (typically metal) "by electromagnetic induction, where eddy currents (also called Foucault currents) are generated within the metal and resistance leads to Joule heating of the metal."

What this means for you is that while normal cookware with copper or aluminum bottoms are not suitable for induction cooking, the advantages are that induction cookers are more efficient and safe (because the cook-top is not heated itself) and speed. They come in two types:

  • Multi-element induction cooktops that are hard wired with 220 volt electricity that have individual burners with ratings up to 3600 watts.

  • Portable induction cooktops that are self-contained units with a single element and have a standard 120 volt electric cord.

1. Does the cookware heat up on modern day induction cooktops

The first and most important aspect of your purchase is making sure that what you are buying will work. As mentioned earlier, regular cookware does not work on induction cooktops so special cookware is needed. Also, cast iron will work on induction cooktops, but usually not as well as the stuff specific to the induction process. So buy wisely.

2. Use a magnet

If you are buying cookware and it is not labeled for induction, or you are curious, attach magnet to the bottom. If it clings to bottom, it is "induction-ready" and you are ready to go.

3. Try it before you buy it

That is, if you can. If you are buying remotely like from an online store and it is not labeled "induction-ready" take a trip to a local supply store and ask or try it yourself (the magnet trick). Then, after you decide, make the purchase that you set out to make.

Buying conduction cookware doesn't have to be difficult. If you have any questions about how we can help you make the right choice for your kitchen, contact us any time.