How To: The Quest for the Easy to Peel Egg

Despite the popularity and seeming ease of things like Deviled Eggs and egg salad, up until now many have cringed at the idea of producing these tasty treats. It all comes down to the question of how to peel eggs easier. The...

Despite the popularity and seeming ease of things like Deviled Eggs and egg salad, up until now many have cringed at the idea of producing these tasty treats. It all comes down to the question of how to peel eggs easier.

The quest for the perfect easy-to-peel eggs starts long before you’re holding the egg in your hand trying to figure out how to get the shell off without taking half of your whites with it. As with all journeys, the first step to perfection is all in the preparation.

First, turn your stove on and give the burner time to get nice and hot.

While the burner is getting hot, put your eggs in a boiler large enough to allow all the eggs to rest against the bottom, so that they do not overlap each other. Add enough water to cover the top of the eggs by about an inch. Then comes the secret-add 2 teaspoons of baking soda to the water.

The most important secret in this step is the baking soda. A lower PH (more acidic) level makes eggs more difficult to peel. This is why fresher eggs, which contain a lower Ph, are more difficult to peel than ones which are a couple of weeks old. But, fresh egg lovers rejoice! The Baking Soda Trick renders fresh eggs as easily peeled as those with a little more time under their shells.

You see, just as a lower Ph can make eggs more difficult to peel, a higher (or less acidic) PH renders peeling a snap. The addition of baking soda to the water before boiling allows you to change the Ph of your egg to a more desirable state, making this the first and perhaps most important step in our journey to the easily peeled egg.

How to peel an egg
How to peel an egg

Boil the eggs between 15 – 20 minutes then take off the heat.

Just before taking the eggs off the burner prepare an ice bath to place the eggs in, again with enough room so that they do not have to sit on top of each other, with enough ice to cover the eggs by about an inch.

When the eggs are done, take them straight from the pot using a slotted spoon and place directly into the iced bath. This will shock the eggs and stop the cooking process. Store them in the fridge still in the ice bath for half an hour before removing to peel.

The last step of this journey is of course the actual peeling of the egg, and we need something truly special here. In fact, we need a process that would seem almost magical in the ease with which the shell gives up its prize.

Remove the egg from the cold water, and hold it so that it lays flat with your prep surface. Strike the egg once, firmly but not too hard. Then place the palm of your hand over the egg and roll forward once. Stop the moment you see the cracks reappear as this will let you know the egg has come all the way around.

The peel will glide off the egg with ease, no more problems with peeling eggs.

If you wish to see the process in action you can check out this YouTube video.

For more tricks and tips to make your cooking easiercontact us.