Pressure Cookers; Fear to Fondness

It happens to everyone. You’re in the middle of a work meeting, running errands or volunteering at your child’s school and a realization strikes – you forgot to start tonight’s dinner in the crock pot before you left the...

Pressure Cooker

It happens to everyone. You’re in the middle of a work meeting, running errands or volunteering at your child’s school and a realization strikes – you forgot to start tonight’s dinner in the crock pot before you left the house. You could run home and get the crock pot going, or dinner tonight might consist of grabbing tacos at the local drive-through. Both options will get supper on the table, but there is another alternative. It’s still possible to have that yummy roast, delicious warm stew, tender short ribs or other scrumptious, slow-cooked fare with a pressure cooker. If the idea of cooking with a pressure cooker has you heading for the hills, learn how to go from fear to fondness for this modern marvel.

Pressure Cooker Fear

Pressure cooker phobia has kept many home cooks from experiencing the joys of making a delicious, slow-cooked meal in a fraction of the time. Stories of lids popping and food splattering all over the kitchen ceiling and walls have overshadowed the benefits of this fabulous cooking invention. Old-style pressure cookers with a weight-modified valve were more difficult to use and food disasters did occur. However today’s modern pressure cookers are equipped with several safety features and are now safe and easy to use.

Pressure Cooker Fondness

Pressure cookers work by heating up a recipe’s liquid, creating steam. The steam is incapable of escaping which increases the pressure, thereby raising the temperature it takes for the liquid to boil. Because the liquid boils at a higher temperature, the food cooks more quickly. The steam also works to make food tender and lock in flavor. While pressure cookers aren’t right for delicate foods or things that cook quickly, they work magic on tough pieces of meat, brown rice, stews, soups, legumes and other foods that normally require extended cooking; in a fraction of the time. Cook a pot roast and vegetables in 45 minutes, brown rice in 20 minutes, chili in 35 minutes and a whole chicken in 25 minutes.

Learn to use a pressure cooker and experience the pleasure of delectable, hearty dishes cooked quickly and effortlessly. For more information or to purchase a pressure cooker, shop our store or online catalog.