Red Velvet

Red Velvet I know this is going to sound strange, but the first time I had red velvet was last year when my older daughter and one of her friends made cupcakes for a fundraising at school. 37 years old, and...

Red Velvet
Red Velvet

I know this is going to sound strange, but the first time I had red velvet was last year when my older daughter and one of her friends made cupcakes for a fundraising at school. 37 years old, and my first time eating red velvet cake. How pathetic is this? So when she got home from school this afternoon and asked she could make one, I was glad to hear it. At the same time, I thought it would make a nice post for you. I don’t know much about red velvet cakes. We found this recipe online and I couldn’t wait for her to bake it and taste this delicious cake for a second time.

Since I’m curious by nature, I Googled to find out more about this popular cake. Thanks to Wikipedia, here’s what I found. When foods were rationed during World War II, bakers used boiled beet juices to enhance the color of their cakes. Beets are found in some red velvet cake recipes, where they also serve to retain moisture. The cake and its original recipe are well known in the United States from New York City's famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. In Canada, the cake was a well-known dessert in the restaurants and bakeries of the Eaton's department store chain in the 1940s and 1950s. Promoted as an exclusive Eaton's recipe, with employees who knew the recipe sworn to silence, many mistakenly believed the cake to be the invention of the department store matriarch, Lady Eaton.

What an interesting story! My history with red velvet is way shorter than this. But still, I can always appreciate a good cake!

Ingredients

  • ? cup unsalted butter, at room
  • 2 cup  sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 tsp  vanilla extract
  • 2 ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup regular cocoa powder (not Dutch process)
  • 1 tsp  baking soda
  • ½ tsp  baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 ½ cup buttermilk, at room temperature
  • 1 ½ Tbsp white vinegar
  • 1 tsp red food colouring paste (preferred over liquid colour)*

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Grease two 8-inch square pans (or line your muffin pan with paper cups) and line the pans with parchment so that it comes up the sides as well.
  2. Using electric beaters or in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter until smooth, then add the sugar and beat until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time and beating well after each addition, beat in the vanilla.
  3. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Add this alternately with the buttermilk, starting and ending with the flour. Stir the white vinegar and food colour together and add this to the cake batter on low speed, but mixing until blended in. Scrape the batter into the prepared pans and spread to level.
  4. Bake the cakes for about 35 minutes, or until a tester inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Cool the cakes in their pans for 20 minutes, then turn them out to cool completely.

My 15 year old daughter baked this red velvet cake and we all enjoyed it for dessert tonight. I know that usually it’s served with a nice and sweet creamy icing, but I prefer it without. Sweet is good, but not too much. If you prefer your cake with icing, find your favorite cream cheese icing and just put some on top. This is a great recipe, not too complicated, and will give you fantastic results. This is the recipe for a full cake. If you bake it like we did muffin sized, just watch the time of baking. It’s probably going to be ready 5 minutes earlier. Aside from this cake being one of the greats, I find its name just awesome. Red Velvet - what a sexy name for a cake!!