Some Advice on Poultry Safe Preparation and Roasting

How to Prepare Poultry The advice on poultry for safe preparation is something that needs following closely because birds tend to be bearers of food borne illnesses such as salmonella.. About.com's page on chicken and poultry safety advises that...

How to Prepare Poultry
How to Prepare Poultry

The advice on poultry for safe preparation is something that needs following closely because birds tend to be bearers of food borne illnesses such as salmonella..

About.com's page on chicken and poultry safety advises that one should never try to thaw a frozen chicken or other kind of poultry at room temperature or in a microwave. Instead it is advised to thaw a bird over two or more days in the refrigerator. After the bird is thawed it should not be kept without cooking more than another day. Raw poultry should not be left at room temperature longer than it is necessary to prepare it and start cooking it.

Whether one is preparing a chicken, a duck, or turkey, one has to take care to wash everything that comes into contact with the bird, including hands, utensils, and preparation surfaces. Care also has to be taken to avoid cross contamination by exposing other foods to raw poultry. An example of how this could happen would be to prepare a chicken on a cooking board and then cut vegetables on the same surface without washing the surface first.

A Food Safety page run by the United States government recommends that any sort of poultry be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees in order to kill whatever bacteria exists.

Cooking times and oven temperatures for various birds are usually included with the package or in the recipe. Turkeys, for example, are roasted with time measured according to the weight of the bird. A good roasting time for chicken is about an hour and a quarter to an hour and a half. In any event, a good meat thermometer will determine if a bird is at the safe internal temperature.